Randall Radic

Editor/Writer, Group At Old Pink

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Professional Experience

In 2009, I had two non-fiction books published by ECW Press of Toronto, Canada.
In 2011, two more of my non-fiction books were published, one by Headpress of the U.K. (under my pen name of John Lee Brook), the other by Atlantic. The latter book discusses how to market and sell luxury goods to affluent customers. The Headpress book hit the genre bestseller lists in Europe. The title of the book is: Blood In Blood Out: The Violent Empire of the Aryan Brotherhood. It was released in the U.S. in the middle of June 2011.
In 2012, Terminal Disaster: Inside the Money Machine was just published.
Beauty (non-fiction) will be published in 2012.
My contributions appear in AND Magazine: http://www.andmagazine.com/content/phoenix/11758.html.
I write blogs for Blog Critics and do freelance editing and ghostwriting, along with being a contributor to G.A.M.E. Magazine, where I interview people in fashion, business, and entertainment: http://gamemagazine.presspublisher.us/issue/april-2011/article/what-the-f-fashionable-futuristic-and-fearless-anthony-eastwick-eastwick-america-collection.
I worked as an editor at Alvahâ s Books, where I wrote book reviews: http://www.alvahsbooks.com/book-reviews/review-the-aryan-jesus-by-susannah-heschel/. I wrote business book reviews for Silver Monthly and contribute to Crime Magazine, and Mayday Magazine.
You can check out my shorter stuff at: http://blogcritics.org/culture/article/marketing-luxury/, or at: http://crimemagazine.com/sex-money-murder.

Education

University of Arizona
Trinity Seminary
Agape Seminary

Other Interests

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Debt-Free Junior Producer Discovers Gold Near Arizona's Most Productive Mine
  • by , 1 years ago
  • tags: MS NEM BFGC SRCH GG ABX
  • Submitted by Randall Radic as part of our contributors program . Bullfrog Gold (OTCQB: BFGC), an exploration-stage gold company that is fully funded for the next two years, recently announced that it found unusually high grade gold near the Vulture Mine, Arizona’s most historically productive mine. The Newsboy Gold Project After drilling five holes in its Phase 3 program at the Newsboy Gold Project, located northwest of Phoenix, Arizona, the company reported 13.9 ounces gold per ton at a depth of ten feet. Reverse circulation drilling was used, and drill cuttings were sampled every five feet and then split. The samples were assayed according to U.S. and international QA/QC standards. In 2012, Bullfrog discovered higher grades of ore during the company’s Phase 1 and Phase 2 drilling programs. The discoveries triggered a return to the main Newsboy deposit for Phase 3 drilling. The goal was to determine if further development was warranted. Gold Sector Needs Some Encouragement Analyst reports on the gold industry show signs of caution. As precious metals investors know, the price of gold has been declining over the past few months. As the analysts gaze down into their crystal balls, they come away with different visions of the future. Analysts at several top-tier research firms are positive on the long-term prospects of junior gold producers. In a recent report, analysts at Morgan Stanley predicted that gold would be the “best commodity for 2013.” Remember, though, that gold has always been volatile. Over any three week period, there is a seven percent chance that the price of gold will change by ten percent. And historically the price of gold equities is more unpredictable than that of the commodity. The best thing about gold stocks is that investors usually receive a 2-to-1 leverage by owning gold equities instead. Risks for Bullfrog Gold Like any smaller company, Bullfrog Gold carries certain risks. The company has only been around for two years, and its operating history consists of preliminary exploration activities. Comparable to all exploration-stage companies, Bullfrog has no income producing activities from mining or exploration. As it expands its mineralization, its end-goal is to be acquired by a major producer. If it fails to identify enough ounces of gold on its properties, however, shareholders will end up disappointed. Exploring for gold is an inherently speculative business. Although Bullfrog Gold’s land package is strong and contains prime locations near operational mines, not every exploration-stage land package is ultimately converted into producing mine fields. Although Bullfrog Gold has obtained financing for its Newsboy Project from its debt facility of $4.2 million available until March 31, 2014, the full amount of the loan is due to be repaid on or before December 10, 2014. If Bullfrog Gold is unable to raise project-level financing from a major producer by this time, this debt repayment could come at the cost of equity dilution. Still, the company has the advantage of excellent management. CEO Dave Beling, who used to be at Allied Nevada, knows how to build a successful mining company. If Bullfrog wants to be successful, the company will have to execute correctly and leverage its assets. Conclusion For the most part, a ‘growth for growth’s sake’ mindset seems to pervade the gold mining industry at the present time. With its recent Newsboy discovery, Bullfrog might be well-positioned to take advantage of the industry’s current attitude.
    MusclePharm Muscling In On The Big Boys
  • by , 1 years ago
  • tags: KO MWW PEP MSLPD MNST
  • Submitted by Randall Radic as part of our contributors program . Let’s talk about MusclePharm (MSLPD.OB) for a few minutes. This company has been making waves in the high-tech sports nutrition sector, which is a very competitive market, attracting $25 billion from consumers last year, up from $21.4 billion the previous year. In 2011, MusclePharm’s revenue flow increased 437%, and grew over 500% in 2012. The company reported $17 million in sales revenue in 2011, and crossed over into profitability in late 2012. Management realized that expenses were too high for a revenue-based valuation, so they began restructuring the company, adjusting their business model. Management compensation was reduced and supply-chain middlemen were purged where possible. The smartest move management made was moving in a direction to strip away toxic debt. The result: MusclePharm appears to be fit and trim, ready to do business in a streamlined and efficient manner. According to analysts’ articles on Seeking Alpha, 2013 should be MusclePharm’s year. Citing strong revenue growth and increased margins because of Spartan-like cost-cutting measures, industry analysts forecast $0.10 per share over the next quarter and more than $1 per share for the year. Margins should increase because restructuring hooked management’s net worth to share price appreciation rather than salary, and because MusclePharm’s revenue, which is now near $75 million per year, is to the point where the company can command volume-based deals with suppliers. All this means that MusclePharm should realize around 8% net profit in 2013. EPS numbers tell the true story. Assuming a P/E of 15 on 6 million shares, with a net profit of 8% the scenario follows this road map: 2013 revenue of $75 million 2013 profit of $8.0 million EPS should be $1.46 Price per share should be $21.90 The above numbers are based on the assumption that MusclePharm will announce a financing plan. Such financing would make room for a NASDAQ listing, and allow MusclePharm to wipe out any remaining debt. The removal of toxic debt would get rid of interest payments and simultaneously increase margins. In addition, financing would be a precursor to an SEC filing, which would give share price a kick in the pants. However – and this is a big however – financing is crucial. There are only 2.7 million shares now. Financing would increase this to 6 million shares. This is a step MusclePharm needs to take and, since the company recently brought aboard two executive heavyweights – Gary Davis and John Bluher – it undoubtedly will move in this direction soon. Davis and Bluher know which way the wind is blowing. If MusclePharm grows at a healthy rate for the next five years, say 20% to 40%, the company could capture 2% of the aforementioned $25 billion market. That would be $500 million, which would mean profitability of $40 million. At that point, share price would be near $80 to $100. For a company that’s grown 400% to 500% over the previous two years, this is certainly feasible. MusclePharm doesn’t have to continue with triple-digit growth. Strong double-digit figures would definitely make the company a player in the sports nutrition sector. If management keeps their collective eye on the ball and sticks with their business plan, MusclePharm looks to be a sure-fire winner. No wonder big name, smart-money guys like Dr. Phillip Frost are investing in the company. So far Dr. Frost’s track record is impeccable. He knows a winner when he sees one. And he must see one in MusclePharm. Two years from now, Pepsi or Coke or even Monster Beverage Corporation will probably begin looking to buy MusclePharm.
    The Outlook On MGT
  • by , 1 years ago
  • tags: MGM CZR MGT WMS SGMS
  • Submitted by Randall Radic as part of our contributors program . Speaking of MGT Capital (MGT) – and if we weren’t, we should be – there’s a lot of noise about the company. In fact, there’s so much noise about the company that one has to wonder what’s going on: is there any substance to the racket or is it simply much ado about nothing? To find out, we need to take a closer look at MGT. MGT’s website states that the company “and its subsidiaries are engaged in the business of monetizing intellectual property.” Translation: MGT is a holding company. They seek out and purchase intellectual property, specifically patents. To this end, MGT holds patents in two areas: casino gaming and medical imaging technology. In the latter sector, MGT owns a subsidiary company called Medicsight. Medicsight is being spun off because it lacks relevancy. To this end, MGT has retained the services of Munich Innovation Group to monetize its medical imaging patents; which is a fancy way of saying that Munich Innovation Group is trying to sell the patents. Some analysts place the value of these patents in the $4 to $5 million range. Since MGT recognized that its medical sector was failing, it didn’t hesitate to do what needed to be done. It laid-off employees, got rid of contractors, concluded leases, and got rid of equipment. It essentially dumped the whole medical imaging side of its business lock, stock, and barrel. The result: MGT has no debt and $5.5 million in cash. That number could escalate to $9 or $10 million, depending on how successful the Munich Innovation Group’s efforts are. MGT’s other sector, called MGT Gaming Incorporated, holds a 55% stake in one patent that allows players to vie not only against the house but against other players during bonus rounds in linked slot machines. In November 2012, believing that its patents had been violated, MGT filed suit against five casino companies, claiming patent infringement. The five companies were Caesars Entertainment (CZR), WMS Gaming (WMS), Penn National (PENN), Aruze Gaming America, and MGM Resorts (MGM). MGT hopes to win the lawsuit. Of course, the defendants are hoping that the case is without basis and frivolous, and is thus tossed out. If MGT’s lawsuit proves to be successful, the company stands to make out like bandits. Royalties from the patent are estimated to be worth $330 million to $4.5 billion. Adding spice to the mix is the fact that just recently WMS, a defendant in MGT’s lawsuit, agreed to sell itself to Scientific Games (SGMS) for $26 per share. Both Scientific Games and WMS want the acquisition to achieve culmination because each has what the other needs. Together they stand to increase their revenue streams appreciably, primarily through organic growth and enhanced gaming opportunities. There is some speculation that Scientific Games will apply pressure on WMS to settle the MGT lawsuit before it goes to trial. If so, and if WMS settles out of court, this would put indirect pressure on the other four defendants to do likewise. Independent analysts seem to believe that the confluence of events works in MGT’s favor. Savvy investors should consider buying up shares of MGT Capital Investments before speculative buyers send shares skyrocketing. If Scientific Gaming’s shareholders perceive a risk, they might hedge their bets in an attempt to mitigate losses by buying up MGT shares. If the outcome of the lawsuit previously discussed goes as most observers expect, such an investment will pay off handsomely. Investors will get a share of either the settlements or the amount awarded to MGT by the court. Many analysts expect shares to double or triple from current prices over the next nine to ten months. All that to say this: MGT appears to be a strong value investment.
    MGM Resorts International Logo
  • commented 1 years ago
  • tags: MGM
  • Outlook On MGM and MGT

    Speaking of MGT Capital (MGT) – and if we weren't, we should be – there's a lot of noise about the company. In fact, there's so much noise about the company that one has to wonder what's going on: is there any substance to the racket or is it simply much ado about nothing? To find out, we need to take a closer look at MGT.

    MGT's website states that the company "and its subsidiaries are engaged in the business of monetizing intellectual property." Translation: MGT is a holding company. They seek out and purchase intellectual property, specifically patents. To this end, MGT holds patents in two areas: casino gaming and medical imaging technology. In the latter sector, MGT owns a subsidiary company called Medicsight. Medicsight is being spun off because it lacks relevancy. To this end, MGT has retained the services of Munich Innovation Group to monetize its medical imaging patents; which is a fancy way of saying that Munich Innovation Group is trying to sell the patents. Some analysts place the value of these patents in the $4 to $5 million range.

    Since MGT recognized that its medical sector was failing, it didn't hesitate to do what needed to be done. It laid-off employees, got rid of contractors, concluded leases, and got rid of equipment. It essentially dumped the whole medical imaging side of its business lock, stock, and barrel. The result: MGT has no debt and $5.5 million in cash. That number could escalate to $9 or $10 million, depending on how successful the Munich Innovation Group's efforts are.

    MGT's other sector, called MGT Gaming Incorporated, holds a 55% stake in one patent that allows players to vie not only against the house but against other players during bonus rounds in linked slot machines. In November 2012, believing that its patents had been violated, MGT filed suit against five casino companies, claiming patent infringement. The five companies were Caesars Entertainment (CZR), WMS Gaming (WMS), Penn National (PENN, Aruze Gaming America, and MGM Resorts (MGM).

    MGT hopes to win the lawsuit. Of course, the defendants are hoping that the case is without basis and frivolous, and is thus tossed out. If MGT's lawsuit proves to be successful, the company stands to make out like bandits. Royalties from the patent are estimated to be worth $330 million to $4.5 billion.

    Adding spice to the mix is the fact that just recently WMS, a defendant in MGT's lawsuit, agreed to sell itself to Scientific Games (SGMS) for $26 per share. Both Scientific Games and WMS want the acquisition to achieve culmination because each has what the other needs. Together they stand to increase their revenue streams appreciably, primarily through organic growth and enhanced gaming opportunities.

    There is some speculation that Scientific Games will apply pressure on WMS to settle the MGT lawsuit before it goes to trial. If so, and if WMS settles out of court, this would put indirect pressure on the other four defendants to do likewise. Independent analysts seem to believe that the confluence of events works in MGT's favor.

    Savvy investors should consider buying up shares of MGT Capital Investments before speculative buyers send shares skyrocketing. If Scientific Gaming's shareholders perceive a risk, they might hedge their bets in an attempt to mitigate losses by buying up MGT shares. If the outcome of the lawsuit previously discussed goes as most observers expect, such an investment will pay off handsomely. Investors will get a share of either the settlements or the amount awarded to MGT by the court. Many analysts expect shares to double or triple from current prices over the next nine to ten months.

    All that to say this: MGT appears to be a strong value investment. [ less... ]
    Outlook On MGM and MGT Speaking of MGT Capital (MGT) – and if we weren't, we should be – there's a lot of noise about the company. In fact, there's so much noise about the company that one has to wonder what's going on: is there any substance to the racket or is it simply much ado about nothing? To find out, we need to take a closer look at MGT. MGT's website states that the company "and its subsidiaries are engaged in the business of monetizing intellectual property." Translation: MGT is a holding company. They seek out and purchase intellectual property, specifically patents. To this end, MGT holds patents in two areas: casino gaming and medical imaging technology. In the latter sector, MGT owns a subsidiary company called Medicsight. Medicsight is being spun off because it lacks relevancy. To this end, MGT has retained the services of Munich Innovation Group to monetize its medical imaging patents; which is a fancy way of saying that Munich Innovation Group is trying to sell the patents. Some analysts place the value of these patents in the $4 to $5 million range. Since MGT recognized that its medical sector was failing, it didn't hesitate to do what needed to be done. It laid-off employees, got rid of contractors, concluded leases, and got rid of equipment. It essentially dumped the whole medical imaging side of its business lock, stock, and barrel. The result: MGT has no debt and $5.5 million in cash. That number could escalate to $9 or $10 million, depending on how successful the Munich Innovation Group's efforts are. MGT's other sector, called MGT Gaming Incorporated, holds a 55% stake in one patent that allows players to vie not only against the house but against other players during bonus rounds in linked slot machines. In November 2012, believing that its patents had been violated, MGT filed suit against five casino companies, claiming patent infringement. The five companies were Caesars Entertainment (CZR), WMS Gaming (WMS), Penn National (PENN, Aruze Gaming America, and MGM Resorts (MGM). MGT hopes to win the lawsuit. Of course, the defendants are hoping that the case is without basis and frivolous, and is thus tossed out. If MGT's lawsuit proves to be successful, the company stands to make out like bandits. Royalties from the patent are estimated to be worth $330 million to $4.5 billion. Adding spice to the mix is the fact that just recently WMS, a defendant in MGT's lawsuit, agreed to sell itself to Scientific Games (SGMS) for $26 per share. Both Scientific Games and WMS want the acquisition to achieve culmination because each has what the other needs. Together they stand to increase their revenue streams appreciably, primarily through organic growth and enhanced gaming opportunities. There is some speculation that Scientific Games will apply pressure on WMS to settle the MGT lawsuit before it goes to trial. If so, and if WMS settles out of court, this would put indirect pressure on the other four defendants to do likewise. Independent analysts seem to believe that the confluence of events works in MGT's favor. Savvy investors should consider buying up shares of MGT Capital Investments before speculative buyers send shares skyrocketing. If Scientific Gaming's shareholders perceive a risk, they might hedge their bets in an attempt to mitigate losses by buying up MGT shares. If the outcome of the lawsuit previously discussed goes as most observers expect, such an investment will pay off handsomely. Investors will get a share of either the settlements or the amount awarded to MGT by the court. Many analysts expect shares to double or triple from current prices over the next nine to ten months. All that to say this: MGT appears to be a strong value investment.
    Has Chipotle Lost Its Sizzle?
  • by , 2 years ago
  • tags: CMG YUM MCD JACK
  • Submitted by Randall Radic as part of our contributors program . In the last few days, Chipotle has been all over the news, especially the business channels. Chipotle is a chain of laid-back Mexican restaurants. They serve stylish laid-back food prepared on shiny foodservice equipment. The company is run by a group of natural-food evangelists who believe their product can and will revolutionize the way people eat. And they might be right, for natural and organic foods are riding atop a wave of popularity at the present moment. Still, the question is, are people willing to pay the price premium such foods command. Some people don’t think so. David Einhorn, who manages a hedge fund, is one of those people. Einhorn announced a few weeks back that he was shorting Chipotle’s stock. He stated that Chipotle’s primary problem was Taco Bell, whose new ‘Cantina Bell’ menu was going to blow Chipotle’s good ship lollipop right out of the water. Unfortunately, Mr. Einhorn’s forecast came true. The company reported third-quarter 2012 earnings last Friday. Needless to say, the report left investors gasping for breath. The stock fell more than 15% on Friday, which means that over the past few months Chipotle has experienced a 40% decline. In April, the stock was trading at $442, before dropping to $200. It rebounded to $239 as of Wednesday. However, the picture is not quite as gloom and doom as it might appear. Chipotle reported 18.4% revenue growth this quarter, with sales jumping 4.8%. And that’s not bad, especially in the current economic climate. However, they do indicate slumping numbers in each area, when compared to previous quarters. CFO Jack Hartung has indicated that Chipotle will increase its prices in 2013, if costs keep going up. The company will be forced to pass on the higher cost of doing business to the consumer. If that happens, some analysts believe that Taco Bell, which most analysts don’t think is a real threat currently, could become a real problem. Most analysts believe that a menu price increase by Chipotle would leave many of its present consumers with a serious case of indigestion. A Chipotle burrito runs around eight dollars, and that’s without guacamole. When that price goes to ten dollars, it may reach its tipping point, which will serve to hinder Chipotle’s momentum. Even with the sharp drop in stock price and the threat of menu price increases, the market doesn’t seem to agree, because Chipotle’s stock is still priced for growth. Analysts expect around $10 in earnings per share over the next four quarters. And the price-to-earnings ratio is still at 24, which is pretty darn high for a company that just predicted “flat” sales. Admittedly, the P/E was at 60 at one point, which may have been too high. Nevertheless, the company is still planning on 160 new locations per year, and up until recently had produced fantastic profits. A few analysts are touting McDonald’s as a better investment. But McDonald’s also missed their earnings targets, and have a forward P/E of around 14 or 15. Chipotle, at 24, looks like a better bet. Sometimes unwarranted pessimism drives a stock down more than anything. In the case of Chipotle, that may be what’s happening.
    RYU Is Fighting For A Niche
  • by , 2 years ago
  • tags: AEO RYUN TRLG LULU NKE ADDYY
  • Submitted by Randall Radic as part of our contributors program . Respect Your Universe (OTC:RYUN) is an athletic wear company, specializing in clothing for those involved in the mixed martial arts industry. By developing special fabrics customized specifically for martial artists, and by adhering to a strict branding strategy, the company, following online profitability, will soon open its first retail store. Breaking into the clothing industry is similar to swimming across a shark infested ocean. It requires cunning, skill and endurance. And not many make it. Nevertheless, RYU hopes to complete the arduous crossing, reaching the same level of success as two other companies that have gone before: Lululemon Athletica Inc. (NASDAQ:LULU) and True Religion Apparel Inc. (NASDAQ:TRLG). Respect Your Universe understands that a shot at success revolves around one thing: tailoring their brand to a specific audience. They learned that lesson from two that already achieved their goal. Lululemon grew out of founder Chip Wilson’s passion for yoga. After suffering through a sweaty, uncomfortable yoga session, Chip began researching technical athletic fabrics. He rented a design studio and began strategizing various ways to make the Lululemon brand ‘sticky.’ Two years later, the first Lululemon store opened in Vancouver, BC. The goal of the store was to be much more than retail outlet. Chip envisioned a place, a community of likeminded people, where people could discuss the benefits of healthy living as well as purchase Lululemon products. The idea not only caught on but took on a life of its own. Soon, Lululemon stores were opening all over the U.S. Lululemon succeeded by focusing on a single target group: women who love yoga. Yoga was continuing to gain popularity, especially among women. Yet a line of clothing designed specifically for Yoga did not exist. Participants arrived in whatever was handy, hoping it absorbed sweat and didn’t chafe. Lululemon changed the Yoga paradigm. Participants didn’t have to suffer physical discomfort while they practiced. There was a line of clothing for just that purpose. In a similar “fashion,” True Religion Brand Jeans targeted a specific group of people: fashionable trendsetters. The jeans were the brainchild of Jeffrey Lubell. As a teenager Lubell wore bleached bell-bottom jeans. Eventually, the jeans fell apart. Rather than buy new ones, Lubell patched them up, using bits and pieces of any fabrics he could get his hands on. That was the beginning of embellished denim wear. Initially, the jeans languished in the Siberia of brand identity – nowhere. The big break came when Lubell bribed an L.A. specialty store to launch his jeans. The bribe consisted of a free pair of jeans for the store’s entire staff. Patrons noticed the jeans, which became an overnight hit. The brand really took off when celebrities began wearing True Religion Brand Jeans. What started as mending old jeans is now a $400 million company that caters to customers at over 125 standalone stores worldwide. (http://www.truereligionbrandjeans.com/company_profile.aspx) RYU hopes to emulate Lululemon and True Religion. The company began when a few friends came together to design the best martial arts performance short available. Their approach was a little different. Thinking outside the box, they sought the input of the top mixed martial arts athletes, asking them one question: what did the perfect pair of shorts look like? They incorporated everything they heard into a pair of shorts. RYU created the short that “the warrior in all of us demands.” That slogan said it all. RYU’s target market wasn’t simply martial arts athletes, but the warrior hidden inside each individual. Lululemon became the gold standard for yoga wear. True Religion became the fashion symbol go-to for thousands of denim trendsetters. Likewise, RYU hopes to establish itself as the first company that comes to mind when mixed martial arts are mentioned. In 2011, RYU began offering it products online as well as in a handful of sporting goods stores. First quarter of sales garnered $70,000. The company forecasts second quarter sales to dwarf those of the first quarter. RYU will be launching its flagship store in Las Vegas later this year. A second store, already in the planning phase, is scheduled for late 2013. So far, Respect Your Universe has won the first few rounds. If the company gets lucky, they’ll pick up momentum along the way, making it unnecessary for them to tap-out.

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